Monthly Archives: September 2015

Trailer: ‘How to Plan an Orgy in a Small Town’

Poster courtesy of Jeremy LaLonde

Watch the trailer for writer-director Jeremy LaLonde’s (“Sex After Kids,” “The Untitled Work of Paul Shepard”) new comedy “How to Plan an Orgy in a Small Town.”

The film is screening at festivals across Canada from September through December!

It stars Jewel Staite, Ennis Esmer, Lauren Lee Smith, Katharine Isabelle, Mark O’Brien, Jonas Chernick, Tommie-Amber Pirie, Kristian Bruun, Gugun Deep Singh, Natalie Brown, Lauren Holly and James McGowan.

The world premiere of “How to Plan an Orgy in a Small Town” takes place on September 19 at 4 p.m. at the Atlantic Film Festival in Halifax.

 

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Missed the world premiere? You can catch the film at upcoming festivals:

September 25, 2:30 p.m. at the Cinefest Sudbury International Film Festival,

September 30, 7 p.m. and October 2, 4:45 p.m. at the Calgary International Film Festival and

October 3, 7 p.m. at the Edmonton International Film Festival.

The movie will also screen at the Whistler Film Festival (December 2 – 6); watch for the dates and times on the festival site.

 

Interview: Andrew Cividino on his coming-of-age drama ‘Sleeping Giant’

“Sleeping Giant”Courtesy of Film Forge
Andrew Cividino’s “Sleeping Giant” has a strong sense of place: Lake Superior. During a boring summer vacation in rural Ontario, young Adam (Jackson Martin) starts hanging around with two local boys, Riley (Reece Moffett) and Nate (Nick Serino), while attempting evermore reckless stunts. As Adam and his new friends allow their emotions to run riot, their experiences become increasingly intense and unpredictable – and with disastrous consequences.
Andrew Cividino                   Courtesy of Film Forge

Andrew Cividino                   Courtesy of Film Forge

Canscreen talked to writer-director Andrew Cividino at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival where “Sleeping Giant” screened after earlier festival dates in Cannes and Munich.
The film’s North American premiere takes place at the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF).

 

What is it about Ontario specifically that had you setting your story about troubled teens on Lake Superior?

The location and the struggles of the boys connect in a few ways. From a tone perspective, there’s the idea that this is a landscape that, beneath the surface of beauty, there’s a menace and danger to it. And if you don’t respect that threat, it will come bubbling up from below. So I liked the idea of that happening to my characters.

What was it precisely about young boys on summer holiday that fed your film’s subterranean premise?

We’re never closer to our primal instincts than at that age. I wanted to get a sense from that setting of just how thin that veneer of civilized behaviour is, and that beneath it is not so much immoral as amoral behaviour, a kind of chaos with not a lot of structure to it. I felt like putting these in a state of nature would allow me to play visually and symbolically with their lives.

You’re also playing with the sheer recklessness of youth, without in the natural outdoors a safety net as might be found in the big city to catch them?

Yes, there’s all the bravado and pride and adrenaline-seeking side of youth, there’s definitely the potential for negative things to happen. And I know people in the community in which we shot die every year from jumping off cliffs, and yet there’s a cliff-jumping culture that I and others grew up with. There was no cliff that I’d rather not jump off of, to avoid feeling the shame of not jumping after my friends had jumped. There’s this weird one-upmanship where your pride and the potential harm don’t seem to figure as a balanced equation. You just have no choice, and so you end up doing stupid things.

Tell us about the three young boy characters, each of whom is different and yet feed into your coming-of-age storyline.

A still from "Sleeping Giant"     Courtesy of Film Forge

A still from “Sleeping Giant” Courtesy of Film Forge

For me, these three characters I see as being on completely different trajectories, and there’s a point of intersection for them. Adam and Riley both want something from each other. Riley is drawn to the stability and the seeming normalcy of Adam’s middle-class existence. He’s got a father and mother figure in a complete family that Riley covets. And Adam has bubble-wrapped parents that are far too protective and don’t engage with or understand him. So Adam is drawn to the recklessness of the other two boys.

Nate is the third character and can come across as a jerk. But he’s the only character who shows true honesty. And even including the adults, he’s the only person in the film who knows exactly who he is and where he’s going in life and is comfortable with that. He’s already figured that out.

So his (Nate’s) cruelty is armour. He and Riley come from a difficult family situation. Riley’s response is to seek comfort, to which there’s a vulnerability. Nate deals with it in the complete opposite way, through sarcasm and cruelty.

So Adam, drawn to reckless boys like Nate and Riley, becomes evermore reckless himself to deal with his own coming-of-age insecurities.

Jackson Martin as "Adam" in "Sleeping Giant"       Courtesy of Film Forge

Jackson Martin as “Adam” in “Sleeping Giant”       Courtesy of Film Forge

He (Adam) kind of lives in a space where things happen to him a lot, and he’s a fairly passive character. So it takes a lot of hurt and sense of helplessness to jump-start a sense of agency within him. And he starts to act out and take control of his situation, but hasn’t figured out how to control that and the sense of consequences that might ripple out. That’s where the title came from – an awakening for Adam, the idea of coming to terms with the fact that he does have power.

The film climaxes with a cliff-jumping scene where Nate leaps not with fear but curious nonchalance. Why did you choose that motivation for his character?

This cliff they’re up on is virtually impossible to jump. And Nate really doesn’t think Riley will ever jump. So we end up with both boys playing chicken with each other. And Nate banks on knowing Riley and knowing he won’t jump and being able to shame him. But when they get up, Riley is too hurt and frustrated. He means it and will jump. By then Nate can’t talk him down. So he jumps with Riley because that’s how loyal he is, at the end of the day.

So Nate, despite his villainous facade, has an inner honour code?

He absolutely does. When you see him becoming more cruel during the film, Nate knows who he is, and Riley is the closest person for him. They really only have one another in their lives. And Riley is trying to spend time with this other family. Riley wants to experience a different future than the one Nate sees for both of them. So he’s losing his closest companion. That’s where a lot of the aggression comes from, towards Adam in particular.

You screened your film in Cannes as part of International Critics’ Week, in Munich and in Karlovy Vary. How have European audiences received it?

The audiences have been so far really great. It’s fun to sit with an audience for your film and experience how they shift as they respond to your material. They’ve responded well to the humour in the film. There’s a lot of story and character to talk about that’s quite serious, and I’m glad that’s what they’ve talked about. But they’ve also recognized the humour in the film.

The “Sleeping Giant” North American premiere takes place at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 15 at 9 p.m. at the Winter Garden Theatre. The second screening is on September 17 at 9 p.m. at the TIFF Bell Lightbox.

For more information, check out the TIFF web page and the “Sleeping Giant” website.

 

 

TIFF: Review: Mina Shum’s ‘Ninth Floor’

“Ninth Floor”Vero Boncompagni/Courtesy of NFB

With “Ninth Floor,” filmmaker Mina Shum (“Double Happiness”) jumps into feature documentary filmmaking with heavy subject matter and a new take on talking-head formats.

Shum’s film booms deeply; its focus is the controversies over the 1969 protests and riots at Montreal’s Sir George Williams University (now Concordia University). The events were sparked when a group of Caribbean students voiced concerns that a professor had directed racist comments and actions toward them. The university’s handling of the complaints caused students from across the city to band together and the situation evolved into a war with the administration.

The heated events took place over 40 years ago, but the outspoken individuals who are interviewed in “Ninth Floor” vividly recount every harrowing instant of the sit-ins, protests and occupation of the university, honouring the significance of this tumultuous and tainted moment in Canadian history. The audience can feel the film reverberate with passion throughout, and the feeling is astonishing.

That overpowering sensation that Shum builds so well with archival footage and courageous interviews plays more quietly in the latter half of the film, but the use of cinematographic styles and crisp editing keep “Ninth Floor’s” heart continuously beating like a steady drum.

“Ninth Floor” has its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) on Saturday, September 12 at 7:15 p.m. at the Scotiabank Theatre.

The second screening will be on Monday, September 14 at 2 p.m. at the TIFF Lightbox.

Missed the TIFF screenings? Keep an eye on the “Ninth Floor” web page on the National Film Board of Canada’s site.

On TV: ‘Full Out’ perseverance: The Ariana Berlin story

Actor Ana Golja, director Sean Cisterna and the real Ariana BerlinCourtesy of Sean Cisterna

“I have a secret for you: this isn’t about gymnastics; it’s about life.” Wise words offered up by “Miss Val,” the celebrated UCLA gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, played by Jennifer Beals, in the made-for-TV movie “Full Out.” And no truer words could apply to the message of this inspiring film, directed by Torontonian Sean Cisterna.

I have a secret for you: this isn’t about gymnastics; it’s about life.” 

– Coach Val

Based on the life of Ariana Berlin, a talented California gymnast who suffered devastating injuries in a debilitating car accident, the film invites viewers to reflect on the true meaning of following one’s dreams in the face of adversity. Confronted with the possibility that she might never do gymnastics again, Berlin inadvertently found herself in the world of hip-hop where she discovered the strength to persevere in both body and spirit.

Cisterna has great admiration for Berlin and took seriously the job of portraying her trials and triumphs. To meet the challenges of making the film, he looked to her story for inspiration.

“We were honestly just taking our cues from this remarkable young girl’s life,” he said.

For Cisterna, the greatest challenge wasn’t shooting the dance or gymnastics scenes; the real question was how to strike a balance between family appeal and the intensity of Berlin’s story. Part of his approach in finding this equilibrium was creating a window into Ariana’s mind, giving the audience greater access to her emotional journey. It also allowed him to enter into some grittier territory, while still maintaining the lighter charm appropriate for younger viewers.

The director said that finding the perfect Ariana was a difficult task, “This was the hardest part we’ve ever had to cast because, not only did they have to be engaging and a talented actor, but they also needed strong dance ability, as well as gymnastics and athletic ability.”

Ana Golja (“Degrassi: The Next Generation”) wound up being the ideal fit – a young actor who not only possessed the dramatic range for the role, but also the physical skills and stamina for what was involved. In preparation for the part, she had to undergo eight weeks of gymnastics training. The real Ariana Berlin was also a key part of the project and performed the complicated gymnastics routines in the movie.

The film does a fine job of alternating between the loose and fun world of hip-hop and the more structured and rigid life of a professional gymnast. It is at times playful and light-hearted but does not shy away from encouraging the audience to ask themselves some hard questions.

“Full Out” will entertain viewers of all ages and, in a world where so many young (and not-so-young) people too easily embrace the words “I can’t,” the film and Berlin’s story move us to think and talk about who and what truly holds us back in life and how we might overcome. It seems Miss Val was right; it’s not really about gymnastics.

 

“Full Out” premieres Friday, September 11 at 7:30 p.m. ET/PT on the Family Channel. For additional airing dates, go to the film’s website.

‘Science Fiction,’ ‘Reelside’: Raj Panikkar on the ‘worlds’ behind Canadian film and TV

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“Reelside” producer and co-director of episodes “Science Fiction” and “Superheroes,” Raj Panikkar, talks about creating sci-fi worlds, the genesis of the series and the minds behind Canadian film and television.

Check out the “Reelside” trailer here.

The six-episode “Reelside” documentary series premiered in Western Canada on Thursday, September 3 on Movie Central and is available on TMN GO and On Demand. 

For more information about episode airing dates and VOD availability across Canada, check out the “Reelside” websites on Movie Central and The Movie Network.

Producer: Brandon Ludwig

Producer/Video Editor: Sheldon Ludwig
Journalist: Dave Roberts


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‘Superheroes’: Matthew Lochner on his ‘Reelside’ episode, Stephen Amell, David Hayter and Lloyd Kaufman

“Superheroes” director Matthew Lochner talks about his wild journey making episode six of the “Reelside” series  — David Hayter (“X-Men,” “Watchmen”) braves a Toronto snowstorm, Stephen Amell’s “‘Arrow’ shrine,” and Troma’s “zany” Lloyd Kaufman.

The six-episode “Reelside” documentary series premieres in Western Canada beginning Thursday, September 3 at 9 PM MT/PT on Movie Central and is available on TMN GO and On Demand.

For more information, check out CanScreen’s trailer post and the “Reelside” website.

Producer: Brandon Ludwig

Producer/Video Editor: Sheldon Ludwig
Journalist: Dave Roberts


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